After a school principal blocked a request to start a conservative organization at his high school, one student fought back and won.

Llano High School junior A.J. Ares wanted to start a chapter of the national organization Turning Point USA so students could “meet and discuss conservative viewpoints and the foundations of our Constitutional Republic.”

But despite Ares gathering signatures from more than 20 percent of the student body, Scott Patrick—the school’s principal—said no to the group’s formation. 

Instead of sitting on the sidelines, Ares fought back, with the help of local and national conservative organizations.

Signatures were gathered and school board members were inundated with emails and phone calls from concerned citizens. 

The Liberty Council—a nonprofit organization that engages in litigation to protect religious liberty—also joined in, informing the principal in a letter that declining the formation of the group was a violation of student rights, according to case law.

Members of the Llano Tea Party and the Highland Lakes Republican Women, as well as other conservatives, demanded an explanation from Patrick on his restrictive approach, noting that other non-academic clubs exist at Llano High School.

Their efforts paid off. 

On November 17, Patrick reversed his original decision and allowed the Turning Point USA chapter to be formally recognized by the school.

The case serves as an example to all of the power of citizens uniting to overturn injustice in their community.