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Boerne Champion High football coach Keith Kaiser marks his seventh year at the Hill Country school about 30 miles northwest of San Antonio. And four of those years include mentoring reigning 14-5A Division II Offensive MVP Luke Boyers.

The 5-foot-11-inch, 190-pound Boyers has created an outstanding athletic career at Champion. A gifted centerfielder who verbally committed to TCU, the multisport senior is equally impressive on the gridiron as the Chargers’ field general.

The four-year letterman manned the safety position as a freshman and was a running back as a sophomore.

“He is mature beyond his age and his athletic ability is just incredible,” Kaiser told Texas Scorecard, adding that Boyers is the only player to make varsity as a 9th grader under him.

According to the coach, the “quiet, humble” Boyers is a dual-threat under center.

“He can just create and extend plays,” Kaiser said. “[He’s one of those quarterbacks] you have to account in the run game and then you got to corral them in the pass game.”

Two moments in Boyers’ football career stood out for Kaiser. There was a spectacular special teams play in which he found the end zone in his freshman season and him “[rising] to the big occasion” in a hard-fought 43-37 win against San Antonio Alamo Heights High during Champion’s 5-2 district season.

After being handed the keys to the offense last year, Boyers led the Chargers to a Class 5A Division II bi-district appearance on the strength of 1,900 passing yards, 20 touchdown passes, and 1,400 rushing yards and 20 TDs.

Boyers began his second and final year as Champion’s starting quarterback with a 41-8 victory over San Antonio Stevens High. The Chargers amassed a whopping 477 total yards of offense to the Falcons’ 102. The quarterback himself chipped in 196 yards through the air and “a little under 100” on the ground, Kaiser said.

The Chargers next play San Antonio Veterans Memorial High.

Regarding his protégé’s commitment to TCU, Kaiser said that the Horned Frogs got a “steal.”

“Their coaches saw what we saw in the young man,” the coach said. “He’s a terrific student, a [National Honor Society] kid. He’s so humble. If you talk to him, he’s probably the shyest guy out there. He doesn’t beat his chest or toot his own horn.”