With early voting beginning in the Republican primary election on Monday, February 14, Texas Scorecard asked candidates in the race for Texas House District 127 a series of questions to help voters make up their minds before heading to the polls.

Candidates
Deanna Robertson
Charles Cunningham (No response received)   

The following are the full, unedited responses we received.

Why are you running for office?
Robertson: There is an assault on our children and their development, and on parental rights. I want to defend our democracy and fight for justice. We are in a pivotal moment in time and I want to ensure our Texas stays free. 

What are the three main issues facing the district you hope to represent? How will you address them?
Robertson: 1) Flood mitigation, address deforestation, growth, retention and detention ponds, and how to move water. 2) School Choice/Parental Rights, I believe that parents should be able to educate their children in a way that aligns with their values, and question their school boards means and motives, we need to clean up our school districts and challenge Plyler v. Doe. 3) Power grid, we need to stop all “green” subsidies, provide proper line maintenance and generator preparedness. 

Texans all across the state are reporting an ever-increasing property tax burden. Should the property tax system be fixed? If so, how?
Robertson: Yes, I propose that we look into East Texas State Rep White’s HB 59 to support a consumption tax in order to end property taxes.

Should Democrats serve as committee chairs in the Texas Legislature?
Robertson: No. 1) recently democrats abdicated their responsibility by fleeing to Washington DC 2) the majority of Texans are conservative and that should reflect in committee chair assignments.

How would you characterize the state’s response to the coronavirus? What would you have done differently?
Robertson: The state’s response to covid was a disaster. First and foremost, we should have never closed down our businesses, places of worship, etc. We did not do proper science or common sense science, which is to observe data. I would have issued public responsibility messaging, protected the elderly and vulnerable, while allowing the young and healthy to go about their normal lives. Then, I would have watched for reliable data trends, and based on hard data, determined what the next course of action should be.

Texas Scorecard

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