Citizens are grieving after a familiar face of the grassroots in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, Chris Dillard, died on Wednesday.

Dillard, a conservative activist and member of the Texas State Guard, was someone you’d meet at almost any grassroots event in the metroplex. What would first catch your attention was his Texan style and beaming smile.

His tragic death led citizens to express how much he had impacted the lives of those around him.

“Chris was arguably the most popular activist in the Metroplex and well-beyond,” True Texas Project CEO Julie McCarty posted. “He never said no when I needed him.”

“He will always be remembered for his hard work and dedication,” Carlos Turcios posted.

Citizens replied to Julie’s post, recalling how warm and personable Dillard was.

“He was always such a nice guy at different events I’d run into him at,” Doug Wyman wrote.

“I met him on election night and had such a great conversation with him,” remembered Julie Anderson. “He talked to my boys like they were grown-ups and encouraged them to stay faithful to conservative values for the right reasons. Oh, how we will miss his voice and his work.”

“I will always appreciate the day he took me to the Texas Scorecard Gala,” Turcios continued in his own post. “And the great conversations we had. May he rest in peace.”

“Chris was so wonderful in many ways,” added Nancy Dillard.

I’ll miss your spirit and smile, Chris Dillard,” posted Jackie Schlegel, executive director of Texans for Vaccine Choice. “Gone far too soon.”

Dillard’s warmth could be felt even through the internet.

“I never met him, but I loved his posts and thought of him as a friend,” commented Tina Shaw.

“Chris was one of my first conservative, funny contacts on [Facebook] many years ago,” commented Carol Doucet.

“It’s heartbreaking,” wrote Karen Starnes of his passing.

Citizens also remembered Dillard as a warrior for the cause of liberty.

“Chris was a great patriot,” wrote Cindy Boedeker.

“He was a consistent, conservative patriot Texan, who everyone could count on to lead the charge in our battle,” recalled Brenda Cash.

“He is going to be missed by so many,” commented Janna Easton. “This is a horrible loss.”

Dillard is survived by his grandmother, mother, brother, daughter, and grandchildren.

Robert Montoya

A former filmmaker, University of North Texas graduate, and one-time assistant language teacher, Robert Montoya misses Japan and the 1980s. He is an investigative reporter for Texas Scorecard.

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