When Travis Gant graduates from high school next year, he’ll leave behind a lasting reminder of the nation’s foundation in faith.

As part of his senior project, Travis is gifting Lovejoy Independent School District with posters depicting the national motto “In God We Trust.”

His project is part of a nationwide movement to return displays of the national motto to public buildings, especially public schools. Texas lawmakers passed a bill last year requiring “In God We Trust” posters to be conspicuously displayed in school buildings if they are donated.

Travis credits his mom, Karla Gant, for helping choose the national motto as his project.

All Lovejoy students are required to complete a senior project before graduation on a subject that interests them.

“We thought it would be a good idea because of my political views and where I’m at in my faith,” Travis said.

The football and baseball player added that as a leader of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, “I thought it would be a good example and a good way of spreading the Lord’s name in school.”

Texas’ new law requires each poster to contain an image of the United States flag centered under the words “In God We Trust” and an image of the state flag. No other words or images are allowed.

Travis’ mentor for his project is Linda Kellogg, founder of the National Motto Project. The Texas nonprofit was established in 2019 to inspire students through public proclamations of faith in God and country.

Kellogg’s group partnered with the American Heritage and History Foundation to provide low-cost posters that comply with Texas law and has already helped distribute them to school districts across the state.

AHHF works with Hobby Lobby to provide affordable frames for the posters.

The posters for Lovejoy ISD will be installed during the next school year. As part of his project, Travis will also give a presentation about the national motto.

Karla said she is proud of the legacy her son is leaving.

“It’s a start to getting God back into public schools,” she said. “Years from now, he can walk back into school and see that.”

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