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According to county data, even residents in the more conservative Collin County need property tax reform and relief.

Texas Scorecard has been analyzing property tax data for cities and school districts in the metroplex, calculating the average property tax bills within the area and tracking the changes in those bills. Though our study was limited to the time frame of 2013-2016 due to changes in Collin County Appraisal District’s reporting, there were still startling tax increases.

Last week, House Bill 2—which would put in place an automatic election trigger for property tax increases over 2.5 percent for large taxing entities—was watered down to exclude school districts from the lowered rollback rate, among other changes.

Homeowners in Plano and Frisco saw the city portion of their property tax bills increase 21 percent and 31 percent, respectively. Independent school districts also hit homeowners with increases, with Plano ISD and Anna ISD’s average property tax bills increasing 21 percent and 42 percent over these three years.

The highest average property tax bills came from the City of Dallas and Lovejoy ISD, which in 2016 were $2,306 and $7,803.

Though this report only contains a short window of data from cities and school districts within Collin County Appraisal District, the evidence is clear: Texans are being forced to rapidly shell out more and more of their hard-earned cash to local governments, and many won’t be able to keep up for very long.

A complete chart of Collin County’s data can be found below:

This is the third in a series of article by Texas Scorecard analyzing property tax data for taxing entities in the DFW metroplex. Previous articles looked at data from Dallas and Denton counties. The final article in the series looks at data from Tarrant County