On Monday, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott approved of Texas’ new political maps for the next decade.

As a part of the recently concluded third special legislative session, lawmakers were tasked with drawing the boundaries for the next decade for 38 U.S. congressional districts, 31 state Senate districts, 150 state House districts, and 15 State Board of Education districts.

The decennial redistricting process was originally set to take place earlier this year during the 87th regular legislative session. Due to canvassing delays, however, the data used to draw new boundaries was not made available until mid-August. As such, the delayed redistricting process took place as a part of a special legislative session, among other legislative items.

The new boundaries will be used for the first time in the 2022 primary and general elections.

Texas has a total resident population of 29,145,505 as of April 1, 2021, based on results from the 2020 U.S. Census. Compared to the 2010 Census, this represents an increase of almost 4 million people, about a 15.9 percent increase.

Ultimately, the boundaries attempt to bolster Republican-held majorities up and down the ballot. The new boundaries will have ramifications for Texas politics and, more broadly, Texas policy for the next decade and beyond.

U.S. Congressional District Boundaries

Due to increases in population growth, Texas was allocated 38 congressional districts, up from 36, of the total 435 congressional districts nationwide.

Based on the U.S. Census data, the ideal congressional district size is that of about 766,987 individuals.

The approved boundaries can be viewed here.

Texas Senate District Boundaries

The number of Texas Senate districts is fixed at 31 per Article 3, Section 2 of the Texas Constitution. Based on the U.S. Census data, the ideal Senate district size is that of about 940,178 individuals, larger than the boundaries for the U.S. congressional districts.

The approved boundaries can be viewed here.

Texas House of Representatives District Boundaries

The number of Texas House districts is fixed at 150 per Article 3, Section 2 of the Texas Constitution. Based on the U.S. Census data, the ideal House district size is that of about 194,303 individuals.

The approved boundaries can be viewed here.

Texas State Board of Education District Boundaries

The number of Texas State Board of Education districts is fixed at 15 per the Texas Education Code, Section 7.101. Based on the U.S. Census data, the ideal State Board of Education district size is about 1,943,034 individuals.

Board members are charged with establishing the curriculum and graduation requirements, reviewing and adopting instructional materials, and reviewing the education commissioner’s proposed award for new charter schools, with the authority to veto a recommended applicant.

The approved boundaries can be viewed here.

What Happens Next?

Barring legal action against the approved boundaries, they will be used in the 2022 primary and general elections.

As a sort of stop-gap measure, in the event the boundaries are not implemented, the Texas Legislature approved legislation in the second special legislative session that set certain date thresholds for the candidate filing period, primary election date, and primary election runoff date.

As of now, the candidate filing deadline is December 13, 2021, with the primary election date scheduled for March 1, 2022. Any potential primary runoff elections will take place on May 24, 2022. The general election is on November 8, 2022.

Jeramy Kitchen

Jeramy Kitchen serves as the Capitol Correspondent for Texas Scorecard as well as host of 'This Week in Texas', a show previewing the week ahead in Texas politics. After managing campaigns for conservative legislators across the state, serving as Chief of Staff for multiple conservative state legislators, and serving as Legislative Director for the largest public policy think tank in Texas, Jeramy moved outside of the Austin bubble to focus on bringing transparency to the legislative process.

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