From a certain perspective, it is hard to think of this as a “good” Friday. It is, after all, the anniversary of the day when the political elite of the 1st century colluded with a corrupt judiciary to execute a man who had done nothing wrong.

This is the day when the high court of Israel convened in contradiction to its own rules, and engaged in an exercise designed specifically to convict Jesus. Not a good Friday.

This is the day when the High Priest Caiaphas finally made good on what he considered to be politically expedient: the death of Jesus. Not a good Friday.

This is the day when Jesus was brought before Pontius Pilate, a politician who feared more for his reputation in Rome than the miscarriage of justice in Jerusalem. Not a good Friday.

This is the day when a mob, seeking to curry favor with the city’s ruling elite, asked for a murderer to be set free. Not a good Friday.

This is the day when Jesus was hung from a cross. Not a good Friday.

This is the day when two Roman centurions, doing their drudgery at the execution sight, unwittingly fulfilled an ancient prophecy. Not a good Friday.

This is the day when darkness covered the Earth. Not good.

This is the day the curtain in the Holy of Holies was torn in two, from the top. On this Friday.

This is the day the burden of our debts was paid in full… by someone else. On this Friday.

This is the day Jesus began three days in the tomb, from which He would arise.

This is a day you can again consider the words of Galatians 5, “For freedom Christ has set us free; stand firm therefore, and do not submit again to a yoke of slavery.”

This is a day you can consider the opportunity to be truly free in Christ.

So yes, this is a good Friday.

Michael Quinn Sullivan

Michael Quinn Sullivan is the publisher of Texas Scorecard. He is a native Texan, a graduate of Texas A&M, and an Eagle Scout. Previously, he has worked as a newspaper reporter, magazine contributor, Capitol Hill staffer, and think tank vice president. Michael and his wife have three adult children, a son-in-law, and a dog. Michael is the author of three books, including "Reflections on Life and Liberty."