John Adams famously described facts as “pesky things,” going on to say “whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence.”

For years a common attack on the veracity of the Bible has been a lack of archeological evidence for the various people mentioned—including such pivotal figures as King David.

The basic attack has been “since there isn’t evidence for King David or these other people, none of this other stuff in the Bible can be true.”

One can almost hear God smile.

There has always been ample physical evidence for the veracity of the Bible as an historical document. Yet the last two decades has produced an unprecedented series of archeological finds. Several years ago at Tel Dan—the remains of an ancient city dating back thousands of years—was uncovered specific evidence for the House of David. It was literally carved in stone. (We’ll be visiting the site during the Empower Texans trip to Israel in 2020 studying the roots of self-governance.)

Earlier this year, the discovery of a 3,000-year-old ring underneath modern day Jerusalem was announced by archeologists. The ring was inscribed as being the property of “Nathan-Melech, Servant of the King.” The Old Testament specifically mentions this person as an official in the court of King Josiah.

As the evidence mounts, the reasons for ignoring the truth of the Bible become increasingly petty.

Working Adams’ famous quip backwards: if we are to be honest we must make sure our passions and inclinations align with the evidence and facts!

Michael Quinn Sullivan

Michael Quinn Sullivan is the publisher of Texas Scorecard. He is a native Texan, a graduate of Texas A&M, and Eagle Scout. Previously, he has worked as a newspaper reporter, magazine contributor, Capitol Hill staffer, think tank vice president. Michael and his wife have three adult children, and a dog. Check out his podcast, Reflections on Life and Liberty.

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