Two weeks ago in an Empower Texans interview, Governor Perry condemned the bailout mentality that is sweeping the states of our nation. Gov. Perry and fellow Gov. Mark Sanford of South Carolina have rightly said that states should exercise restraint when it comes to accepting federal dollars.

Now, members of the El Paso delegationare trying to circumvent the sound policy stance of Gov. Perry and introduce resolutions in both bodies that would request bailout dollars on behalf of Texas.

This course of action was made possible by the actions of a South Carolina liberal attempt hamstring Gov. Sanford. Within the $800-billion-plus -welfare package passed by the U.S. House there is an amendment that allows state legislatures to request money if the governor does not.

State Reps. Joe Pickett, D-El Paso Marisa Marquez introduced their resolution to ask for money on Monday and Sen. Eliot Shapleigh, D-El Paso, is drafting the companion bill in the Senate.

Shapleigh is quoted as saying “not taking the money would be irresponsible.” Though the $15 billion slated to come to Texas would alleviate short term budgeting woes it will do nothing to address the taxing and spending pandemic that has brought us to a place where we are actively contemplating a statewide bailout.

The bailout funds released to the state would surely come with stipulations that in the end would have us paying more from our state coffers to expand current programs and create new boondoggles. This is a course of action that Texas can ill afford to take.

Taking federal money for one-time expenditures that have no strings? Sure. But one-time dollars that grow programs and commit us to bigger government and higher taxes? Stay away.

The fiscally responsible course of action is to cut out government spending by adding transparency and spending limits and lower taxes through property tax relief. This will endear the state to both businesses and individuals seeking to prosper in sound economy.

Daniel Greer

Daniel Greer is Executive Director of Direct Action Texas, a statewide research and election integrity watchdog. You can learn more about the organization at www.DirectActionTexas.com.

RELATED POSTS

McAllen Plans Property Tax Hike

City leaders for the largest city in Hidalgo County have characterized the tax hike as a tax cut, but the average tax bill will increase by $77.