Once a stronghold for Dallas County Republicans, Democrats in Richardson are on the march and recruiting a volunteer army to push for power in the upcoming local elections.

After making great gains in Texas in the 2018 midterm elections, Texas Democrats are doubling down in their objective to make Texas blue. The Texas Democrat Party launched “Project LIFT” in 2015 to recruit candidates in local elections, and along that line of action, Richardson-area Democrats have recently been blasting social media, asking for volunteers. The organization has scheduled three dates of block-walking events to help push their candidates.

The sound of Democrats blowing their battle horns should be cause for alarm for conservative activists across North Texas. As taxpayers are certainly aware, victories at the local level would provide Democrats with even more opportunities to locally push their platform of high taxes and open borders and build up a strong bench of candidates to run for higher office.

For example, former U.S. Senate candidate Beto O’Rourke, who came extremely close to toppling U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R–Texas) and managed to help several Democrats down ballot win in 2018, served on the El Paso City Council from 2005 to 2011 before being elected to Congress.

Richardson is not the only local election in the DFW metroplex where Democrats are moving, either. The chairwoman of the Tarrant County Democratic Party, Deborah Peoples, announced a month ago that she would challenge Fort Worth Mayor Betsy Price.

With Democrats expected to spend upwards of $250 million in the 2020 election, conservatives need to take them seriously and start building their defenses now. Allowing them to win at the local level and expand their beachhead in Texas would only further jeopardize Republican control in the state. Should Democrats succeed in taking Texas, taxpayers’ goals of property tax relief, secure borders, and fiscal responsibility could be naught but a distant dream.

Information in this article has been updated since it was originally published.

Robert Montoya

A former filmmaker, University of North Texas graduate, and one-time assistant language teacher, Robert Montoya misses Japan and the 1980s. He is an investigative reporter for Texas Scorecard.

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