At the time of filing to run for the Republican nomination for U.S. Senator this week, Tom Leppert said: “Texans are tired of watching the dysfunction in Washington and hearing the same old excuses from politicians for failing to get things done.”

And with that statement you have yet another example of why it is easy to conclude that Leppert is no small government conservative. Not only did he govern Dallas as a big spending, big government mayor, courting the SEIU, ACORN, Young Democrats, and other Leftist groups, his personal philosophy is partly in-line with the Left.

Conservatives understand that our founders created a federal government that purposely has a hard time getting things done. Conservatives understand that we should look to Washington to “get things done” in very limited circumstances. Conservatives understand that power-hungry D.C. politicians will always be dysfunctional and callous toward Liberty as they seek to wield power over their fellow man.

Our founders and framers understood this but, Tom Leppert doesn’t. He clearly believes that our Federal government should “get things done” without delay. Let me remind you that this very situation, the House, Senate and White House in the hands of one party agreed upon getting things done quickly, is how we got the greatest debt-spending in American History; a takeover of health care by the Federal government, and; a ballooning of the regulatory state to such a degree that our productive capacity as a nation is seriously threatened.

If Tom Leppert thinks Texans need, as a priority, someone in Washington “to get things done”, he is running in the wrong party’s primary.

Pratt on Texas

Robert Pratt has been active in Texas Republican politics since the Reagan re-elect in 1984. He has served as Lubbock County Republican chairman, and in 2006 founded the Pratt on Texas radio network, providing the news and commentary of Texas on both radio and podcast. Learn more at www.PrattonTexas.com.

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