With plummeting oil prices, soaring unemployment, and the absence of a plan from Gov. Greg Abbott on reopening the state’s economy that he and other officials have shut down, more and more lawmakers are sounding off about the need to quickly reopen the state.

In an interview with Lubbock radio station KFYO, Republican State Rep. Dustin Burrows of Lubbock encouraged listeners frustrated with their property tax bills to demand tax relief from their local government. Burrows also expressed his belief that the state should swiftly “move forward” from the pandemic that thus far has been much less severe than experts predicted.

In an interview with KFYO’s Chad Hasty, Burrows answered questions about a property tax explainer video he filmed this past weekend, in which he encouraged homeowners to contact their local officials and demand property tax reductions and discussed how Texas should be responding to the Chinese coronavirus pandemic.

Below is a short accounting of Burrows’ remarks on relevant topics.

On local Chinese coronavirus task forces and task forces in general:
“You can’t task force your way out of this. People need to be in charge of their own life, and we need to move forward.”

On spending cuts:
“There are more than enough signs that at all levels of government, we’re gonna have to do more with less. That’s really the message.”

On tax hikes:
“I saw some people—even some people in my own party—telegraph that we should do tax hikes. That is absolutely the wrong thing to do.”

On keeping waived regulations waived:
“This is a good opportunity for us to prove we actually don’t need regulations, that markets can actually do things.”

The full interview can be heard here.

Cary Cheshire

Cary Cheshire is the Vice President of Texans for Fiscal Responsibility. A 6th Generation Texan, Cary attended Texas A&M University was active in a number of conservative causes including Ted Cruz's Senate campaign. He has also worked on campaigns to elect conservatives to Congress and the Texas Legislature. Cary enjoys college football, genealogy research, and the occasional craft beer.

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