Ending a 37-day paralysis, the Texas House of Representatives gaveled in Thursday with enough lawmakers present to allow them to conduct legislative business.

A majority of Democrat lawmakers left just five days into the first called special legislative session on July 13, with many fleeing to Washington, D.C., in the reported hopes to convince the U.S. Congress and Senate to consider election legislation allowing more federal involvement in state-run elections. Ultimately, with their efforts in lobbying proving unsuccessful, many began to trickle back home to Texas—but still attempting to stay away from the Capitol—precluding consideration of Gov. Greg Abbott’s special session agenda.The agenda includes things like an omnibus election integrity bill, protections for youth sports, and requiring that public school athletes play in sports associated with their biological sex on their birth certificate.

Meanwhile, the Senate has largely worked through the items on the special session agenda twice.

No doubt, the current situation remains tenuous. The political calculus surrounding the order in which the House considers bills will likely be the deciding factor, assuming that Republican leadership continues to be reluctant to prevent the same lawmakers from busting quorum again.

After establishing that a quorum existed, the House then adjourned until 4 p.m. on Monday, August 23.

Seventeen days remain in the second called special legislative session.

Jeramy Kitchen

Jeramy Kitchen serves as the Capitol Correspondent for Texas Scorecard as well as host of 'This Week in Texas', a show previewing the week ahead in Texas politics. After managing campaigns for conservative legislators across the state, serving as Chief of Staff for multiple conservative state legislators, and serving as Legislative Director for the largest public policy think tank in Texas, Jeramy moved outside of the Austin bubble to focus on bringing transparency to the legislative process.

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