At least one of Texas’ publicly funded universities has found a way to usher in vaccine passports.

The University of North Texas has issued policies ahead of the 2021-2022 academic year requiring all students to participate in COVID-19 testing programs, under threat of suspension or expulsion, unless the student produces proof of having had one of the COVID jabs.

As UNT puts it, “Vaccinated individuals can opt-out of the mandatory testing requirement by uploading proof of vaccination by Sept. 10.”

Earlier this month, the school’s president, Neal Smatresk, sent an email to families of students enrolled at UNT that attempted to require masks on campus, in compliance with the City of Denton’s orders.

“I request that all students, faculty, and staff comply with a new mandate from the City of Denton to wear a face covering indoors per CDC guidance for our region,” wrote Smatresk on August 13.

Now, however, that particular “request” is missing from the university’s “health alerts” website.

Apparently Smatresk decided that, as a state agency requiring state funds, his boss wasn’t the mayor of Denton.

Meanwhile, the University of Texas is not providing an “out” from its mandatory testing for students who have had one of the COVID-19 shots. According to an FAQ​ on their COVID-19 procedures, UT states: “Being fully vaccinated does not exempt you from testing due to the possibility of breakthrough cases among vaccinated individuals.”

Like U.T., Texas A&M is requiring all students and faculty to be tested without a vaccination opt-out.

[NOTE: This article has been updated with Texas A&M’s COVID-19 policy.]

Michael Quinn Sullivan

Michael Quinn Sullivan is the publisher of Texas Scorecard. He is a native Texan, a graduate of Texas A&M, and Eagle Scout. Previously, he has worked as a newspaper reporter, magazine contributor, Capitol Hill staffer, think tank vice president. Michael and his wife have three adult children, and a dog. Check out his podcast, Reflections on Life and Liberty.

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