In a top-notch piece in the Halloween edition of National Review, Pratt on Texas Listener Club member Kevin D. Williamson writes about the “witch hunt on Wall Street” known as Occupy Wall Street.

Following a description of one of the movement’s icons, a Marxist-Leninist proponent who is a professor at New York University and his speech to the bums assembled, Williamson points out: “They wish to identify malefactors and to denounce them, because doing so requires very little intellectual work and is emotionally satisfying – and if this rabble stands for anything, it is the avoidance of unpleasant work and the satisfaction of emotions that are adolescent at best and very often pre-adolescent.”

Williamson’s story is much more broad and important than this one paragraph but, these words well sum what many instinctively know about the so-called occupy movement. That’s why so many, at the same time across the country, came up with the counter-slogan: Occupy a Job.

Those who have clearly passed the mental stage of youthful victimhood and moved to a life of rewarding self-responsibility and direction, innately understand that a large part of these protesters are simply the lazy who want everyone else to pitch-in to carry their water from the well each morning.

Very early in life it became clear to me that many on the always dissatisfied Left, and even a few on the far-Right, are individuals who, for some reason or another, feel heavily disaffected in society and haven’t effectively emerged mentally from adolescence.

I’m not a psychologist and my opinion is only assertion but, my experience is broad and deep and it all leads me to tell the occupiers: Grow up!

Pratt on Texas

Robert Pratt has been active in Texas Republican politics since the Reagan re-elect in 1984. He has served as Lubbock County Republican chairman, and in 2006 founded the Pratt on Texas radio network, providing the news and commentary of Texas on both radio and podcast. Learn more at www.PrattonTexas.com.

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