Update: This article has been updated to reflect the House’s companion being set for a calendar.

This week, Senate Bill 2202 by State Sen Brandon Creighton (R–Conroe), legislation to stop Texas teachers from being compelled to teach controversial critical race theory, passed in the State Senate.

The legislation passed on an 18-13 party-line vote. 

SB 2202 “promotes the adoption of a curriculum that promotes the understanding of the moral, political, and intellectual foundations of the country, the processes of governance at the local, state, and federal levels, and the founding documents of our nation.”

The bill states that a teacher may choose to discuss current or controversial topics in class, but school policies should not compel teachers to do so, and a teacher should promote “all diverse viewpoints on the issue.”

Among the required state curriculum materials for the State Board of Education, the bill adds understandings of America’s founding documents, such as letters between the Founding Fathers and the Federalist Papers.

The bill also prevents teaching that any race or sex is superior to another.

Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick issued a statement after the passage of Creighton’s bill. 

“Texans reject critical race theory and other so-called ‘woke’ philosophies that maintain that one race or sex is inherently superior to another race or sex or that any individual, by virtue of his or her race or sex, is inherently racist, sexist or oppressive. These divisive concepts have been inserted into curriculums around the state, but they have no place in Texas schools. SB 2202 will ensure that they cannot be taught,” said Patrick.

“When Texan parents send their children to school, they expect their students to learn to think critically without being forced to consume misinformation about our country’s founding and the biases of advocacy groups that seek to belittle our democracy and divide us. I congratulate Sen. Creighton and the Texas Senate for passing this critical legislation for our children and our schools.”

Similar legislation in the House, House Bill 3979 by State Rep. Steve Toth (R–The Woodlands), passed out of the Public Education Committee last week and is on the calendar for Tuesday, May 4.