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The establishment in the Texas House of Representatives is working overtime to promote one of their own.

State Rep. Drew Springer (R–Muenster) is currently in a runoff for a seat in the Texas Senate against Dallas salon owner Shelley Luther, who made headlines earlier this year for opening her salon in the face of shutdown mandates.

Though Luther took first place in the special election in September, no candidate received over 50 percent of the vote, triggering a special election runoff scheduled for December 19.

Now one of the most liberal Republicans in the Texas House is soliciting support for Springer from his colleagues. 

In an email obtained by Texas Scorecard, State Rep. Charlie Geren (R–Fort Worth)—one of the most liberal Republicans in the Texas House—encourages his fellow Republican lawmakers to rally around Springer:

Members,

 

As you know, our colleague and good friend Drew Springer is running to fill the Texas Senate District 30 seat being vacated by Congressman-elect Pat Fallon in a special election set to take place December 19. Throughout his legislative career, Drew has demonstrated nothing short of genuine concern for the betterment of Texas and the quality of life of its citizens. While he would no doubt be missed by many of us in the House, I am fully confident we all stand to benefit from his experience and leadership in the Senate. 

 

Unfortunately, but not surprisingly, Drew’s opposition is being heavily funded by many of the same dark-money interest groups who have long sought to undermine many of our own constituents and buy off seats in the legislature. With a little more than a month until the election, he needs our support. 

 

Therefore, today I am making a financial contribution to Drew’s campaign, and I am respectfully encouraging each of you to join me in supporting the right candidate for Texas SD 30. 

 

Thank you in advance for your support in this effort, and for your continued service to the State of Texas.

Geren is the last remaining Republican in the chamber who worked with Democrats to elect Joe Straus as Speaker of the House in 2009. With Geren’s help, Straus went on to obstruct conservative reforms for a decade before being forced to retire from the legislature.

Given Springer’s campaign has largely revolved around his endorsements from fellow politicians, Geren’s appeal is not particularly surprising. 

Finance reports, to be released on December 11, will reveal how many of his colleagues have fallen in line.